Photo Credit: Hefyn

 
Rough water and waves but Quite safe in a celtic longboat.

Rough water and waves but Quite safe in a celtic longboat.

A trip to three cliffs bay.  

A trip to three cliffs bay.

 

 

Celtic Longboat or Yole???

 

Here we have the men's crew from 2012 racing at Ramsey island.  They are in a Celtic Longboat and did the 7.5 mile race in 1 hr and 2 minutes.

The Celtic Longboat hast fixed seat which means that each stroke is completed with just body lean and arm strength.  The legs are mainly just used as a brace to push against the foot box.  It's sort of like a dead lift in the gym.  You use one oar and the cox steers.  The boats are stable, very good in rough water and can be rowed across the widest part of the Irish sea in a little under 17 hrs (in decent conditions!!).  There are men's, women's and mixed team, with no upper age limit.

This boat is a continental style sea boat, referred to in Wales as a 'yole'.  This one is made in France.  they have sliding seats and you have two oars to each rower (Sculls).  the one pictured is a 'double scull'.  This boat is also good in rough conditions but takes more skill and it has a sliding seat which means it is a faster boat than a Celtic Longboat.  this is the type of boat you would row in the FISA World Coastal Rowing Championships.

Don't know what's going on here!, but Lisa and Joy where very fast once they got used to the boat!  

Don't know what's going on here!, but Lisa and Joy where very fast once they got used to the boat!

 

 

Croker V Concept II

The debate rages on, which are the best performing blades for the long boat. The Concept II Dreissigacker blades prove significantly lighter and of course have finer handles, all lightening up boat load especially useful over long distance; but the Croaker blades are what most of us know and are familiar with the feel of. The reason for the purchase of the Concept II blades, the collars of which had to be adjusted at the club, was in the spirit of widening the provision of equipment at Mumbles and not relying on a single source, usually with a waiting list, when we need equipment for our boats. In this way a little bit of competition between suppliers and manufacturers is good and also the experience of rowing with equipment of varying design may also be viewed as good practice.
— Christian H
 
A training row to scar weather beacon, 10 miles out from Mumbles in 2014.

A training row to scar weather beacon, 10 miles out from Mumbles in 2014.